Bruce honored for 35 years of service

Bruce honored for 35 years of serviceCameron Bruce receives the flag flown in honor of his service. — U.S. Navy photo by Paul Kakert

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Cameron Bruce, outgoing director for business development, was recognized for 35 years of service at Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division during a May 17 flag-raising ceremony at China Lake.

“My family, we’re all in the military, and tradition is really important,” he said during the ceremony. “I appreciate all of you being here, and I appreciate all of the memories we’ve shared.

“As I leave, you are left with the legacy to carry on.”

Bruce’s NAWCWD career began at China Lake as an electronic technician and co-op student.

While the bulk of his career was spent in airborne signature suppression and countermeasures, his engineering career began with the missile-borne integrated neural network demonstration project.

He then worked with Lockheed Skunk Works and on scaled composites for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

“A detour through the Cost Analysis Department (4.2) supporting the Program Executive Officer for Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons was an incredible experience that included some trips to Europe and Australia.”

His work as a cost analyst allowed him to work in the Naval Air Systems Command and the Pentagon before being selected to work in a national position in the Threat/Target Systems (5.3) Department.

As the Navy’s validation coordinator, Bruce worked with the Defense Intelligence Agency, Commander Operational Test Force and director of Operational Test and Evaluations.

His experience in 5.3 is what led him to a Pentagon tour working for the Navy’s Test and Evaluation executive and subsequently serving as the test and evaluation deputy director at Point Mugu.

Reflecting on his career, Bruce said he is very appreciative of the opportunities that he pursued, the people he worked with and the experiences he had.

Having taken advantage of the educational opportunities available, he leaves with four college degrees and a professional engineer license.

Story First Published: 2018-06-01